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Korean Film Festival: "Fourth Place"

This screening is held at the AFI Silver Theatre and Cultural Center. Veteran director Jung Ji-woo’s “poetic and engrossing drama” (Maggie Lee, Variety) examines the world of competitive sports and the toll it takes on its youngest members. Park Hae-jun plays Gwang-su, a washed-up competitive swimmer hired by an ambitious mother to coach her young son, who keeps finishing fourth in competitions. Gwang-su’s increasingly brutal training methods begin to carry on the circle of abuse that destroyed his own youthful athletic career. In addition to its strong performances and important message, Fourth Place boasts gorgeous underwater cinematography that emphasizes the pure joy of swimming. (Dir.: Jung Ji-woo, Korea, 2015, 116 min. DCP, Korean with English subtitles). Event Location: AFI Silver Theatre and Cultural Center. Cost: Tickets can be purchased in advance or on the day of the film, both at the venue and online. The box office opens 30 minutes before the first film of the day. Wednesday, June 1, 2016, 7:00 PM.

Korean Film Festival: "Veteran"

This screening is held at the Cinema Arts Theatres.  Watch the trailer.  The timely subject of income inequality gets the action-comedy treatment in the latest hit from Ryoo Seung-wan (The Berlin File, Crying Fist). Ode to My Father’s Hwang Jun-min stars as Detective Seo, a tough cop on the trail of a sneering heir to a vast conglomerate who uses his money and connections to make the less fortunate pay for his crimes. While the story has clear roots in Korea’s particular variety of class divide, Ryoo’s crisp, fast-paced direction is also an homage to classic Hollywood cop comedies like 48 Hours and Lethal Weapon. As Maggie Lee wrote in Variety, Veteran “delivers honest-to-goodness entertainment that pulses with nonstop adrenaline. . . . The film is unabashedly crowd-pleasing, but so what, if its heart is in the right place?” (Dir.: Ryoo Seung-wan, Korea, 2015, 124 min. DCP, Korean with English subtitles). Event Location: Cinema Arts Theatres. Cost: Tickets are $3 and can be purchased online or in person. Thursday, June 2, 2016, 7:00 PM.

A Thousand Splendid Garments: Reception and Talk with Filmmaker Lee Won-suk

5:30 pm: reception George Washington University Museum and Textile Museum 701 21st Street NW Enjoy Korean delicacies courtesy of the Korean Cultural Center, Embassy of the Republic of Korea, and a display of Korean costumes, including reproductions of Joseon dynasty jeogori by designer Kim Hye-soon. 7 pm: talk GWU Elliott School of International Affairs, Harry Harding Auditorium 1957 E Street NW A wickedly entertaining tale of competition and skullduggery, Lee Won-suk’s The Royal Tailor also is a crash course in the eye-popping splendor of Korean textiles. More than a thousand traditional hanbok garments appear in the film, with the lead actress alone wearing thirty intricately embroidered examples. As a prelude to the screening on June 4, join director Lee Won-suk and Textile Museum curator Lee Talbot, an East Asian textiles expert who previously curated at the Chung Young Yang Embroidery Museum in Seoul, as they discuss the fascinating history of the film’s costumes. Event Location: George Washington University. Cost: Free. Friday, June 3, 2016, 5:30 PM.

Korean Film Festival: "The Royal Tailor"

This screening is held at the National Museum of American History's Warner Brothers Theater. In person: Lee Won-suk, director; Yun Chang-suk, producer; Lee Talbot, curator, Textile Museum Watch the trailer. Featuring more than a thousand gorgeous costumes, Lee Won-suk’s historical comedy-drama tells the story of two tailors—one a staunch traditionalist, the other a brash newcomer—in a Joseon era king’s court. Their rivalry for the king’s favor is so fierce that their clothes are literally to die for. This “gorgeously styled and intricately woven yarn recalls the psychological twists of Mozart and Salieri in Amadeus in its engrossing tussles between craft and creativity, hard work and genius . . . and merits repeat viewings with its sensational visual aesthetic alone, preferably on the big screen,” raved Maggie Lee in Variety. (Dir.: Lee Won-suk, Korea, 2014, 127 min. DCP, Korean with English subtitles). Venue: American History Museum. Event Location: Warner Brothers Theater. Cost: Free and open to the public. Admission is first-come, first-served. Auditorium doors open 30 minutes before showtime. Saturday, June 4, 2016, 2:00 PM.

Korean Film Festival: "How to Use Guys with Secret Tips"

This screening is held at the National Museum of American History's Warner Brothers Theater. In person: Lee Won-suk, director; Yun Chang-suk, producer Watch the trailer. Lee Won-suk’s directorial debut stars Lee Si-yeong as an overworked assistant director of television commercials, who is so disregarded by her coworkers that they leave her behind on a cold beach when she falls asleep during a shoot. When she wakes up, she meets a mysterious hawker who sells her an advice video that he guarantees will turbocharge her romantic life. A cult hit at home and on the festival circuit (it won awards at the Udine Far East Film Festival and Montreal’s Fantasia International Film Festival), How to Use Guys with Secret Tips is credited with breathing new life into the romantic comedy genre. Along with wacky visuals and raunchy jokes, the film boasts generous doses of black humor springing from its director’s “frantic, nearly inexhaustible imagination” (Deborah Young, Hollywood Reporter). (Dir.: Lee Won-suk,… Venue: American History Museum. Event Location: Warner Brothers Theater. Cost: Free and open to the public. Admission is first-come, first-served. Auditorium doors open 30 minutes before showtime. Sunday, June 5, 2016, 2:00 PM.

Korean Film Festival: "The Throne"

This screening is held at the AFI Silver Theatre and Cultural Center. Watch the trailer. Based on the true story of an eighteenth-century king who executed the royal heir by locking him in a rice chest for eight days, Korea’s Oscar entry represents a triumphant return to form by historical drama specialist Lee Joon-ik (The King and the Clown). Anchored by a masterful performance by Song Kang-ho (Snowpiercer, The Host) in the role of the king, “The Throne is palace-intrigue period drama par excellence” that “offers lavish production values and an acting master class from its stellar cast,” according to Clarence Tsui of the Hollywood Reporter. (Dir.: Lee Joon-ik, Korea, 2015, 125 min. DCP, Korean with English subtitles). Event Location: AFI Silver Theatre and Cultural Center. Cost: Tickets can be purchased in advance or on the day of the film, both at the venue and online. The box office opens 30 minutes before the first film of the day. Wednesday, June 8, 2016, 7:00 PM.

Korean Film Festival: "The Throne"

This screening is held at the Cinema Arts Theatres.  Watch the trailer. Based on the true story of an eighteenth-century king who executed the royal heir by locking him in a rice chest for eight days, Korea’s Oscar entry represents a triumphant return to form by historical drama specialist Lee Joon-ik (The King and the Clown). Anchored by a masterful performance by Song Kang-ho (Snowpiercer, The Host) in the role of the king, “The Throne is palace-intrigue period drama par excellence” that “offers lavish production values and an acting master class from its stellar cast,” according to Clarence Tsui of the Hollywood Reporter. (Dir.: Lee Joon-ik, Korea, 2015, 125 min. DCP, Korean with English subtitles). Event Location: Cinema Arts Theatres. Cost: Tickets are $3 and can be purchased online or in person. Thursday, June 9, 2016, 7:00 PM.

Korean Film Festival: "Fourth Place"

This screening is held at the Cinema Arts Theatres.  Veteran director Jung Ji-woo’s “poetic and engrossing drama” (Maggie Lee, Variety) examines the world of competitive sports and the toll it takes on its youngest members. Park Hae-jun plays Gwang-su, a washed-up competitive swimmer hired by an ambitious mother to coach her young son, who keeps finishing fourth in competitions. Gwang-su’s increasingly brutal training methods begin to carry on the circle of abuse that destroyed his own youthful athletic career. In addition to its strong performances and important message, Fourth Place boasts gorgeous underwater cinematography that emphasizes the pure joy of swimming. (Dir.: Jung Ji-woo, Korea, 2015, 116 min. DCP, Korean with English subtitles). Event Location: Cinema Arts Theatres. Cost: Tickets are $3 and can be purchased online or in person. Sunday, June 12, 2016, 7:00 PM.

Korean Film Festival: "Veteran"

This screening is held at the AFI Silver Theatre and Cultural Center. Watch the trailer.  The timely subject of income inequality gets the action-comedy treatment in the latest hit from Ryoo Seung-wan (The Berlin File, Crying Fist). Ode to My Father’s Hwang Jun-min stars as Detective Seo, a tough cop on the trail of a sneering heir to a vast conglomerate who uses his money and connections to make the less fortunate pay for his crimes. While the story has clear roots in Korea’s particular variety of class divide, Ryoo’s crisp, fast-paced direction is also an homage to classic Hollywood cop comedies like 48 Hours and Lethal Weapon. As Maggie Lee wrote in Variety, Veteran “delivers honest-to-goodness entertainment that pulses with nonstop adrenaline. . . . The film is unabashedly crowd-pleasing, but so what, if its heart is in the right place?” (Dir.: Ryoo Seung-wan, Korea, 2015, 124 min. DCP, Korean with English subtitles). Event Location: AFI Silver Theatre. Cost: Tickets can be purchased in advance or on the day of the film, both at the venue and online. The box office opens 30 minutes before the first film of the day. Wednesday, June 15, 2016, 7:00 PM.

Korean Film Festival: "Eyelids"

This screening is held at the National Museum of American History's Warner Brothers Theater.  In this poetic feature from the director of the Sundance Award-winning Jiseul, an old man lives an ascetic existence on a mysterious island, communing in sometimes amusing ways with the wildlife who share his home. Once in a while, the phone rings, heralding a visitor on his or her way to the next world. The old man prepares rice cakes as a last meal for these passersby. Director O Muel wrote the script for Eyelids over the course of three days in grief over the Sewol ferry disaster, in which more than three hundred people, most of them children, lost their lives. Although the references to the disaster in the film are oblique, its elegiac tone movingly conveys its director’s intent to console the souls of the dead. His achievement was rewarded with the CGV Arthouse and the Directors Guild of Korea Awards at the Busan International Film Festival. (Dir.: O Muel, Korea, 2015, 85 min. DCP, Korean with English… Venue: American History Museum. Event Location: Warner Brothers Theater. Cost: Free and open to the public. Admission is first-come, first-served. Auditorium doors open 30 minutes before showtime. Saturday, June 18, 2016, 1:00 PM.

Korean Film Festival: "The Battle of Gwangju"

This screening is held at the National Museum of American History's Warner Brothers Theater.  The 1980 Gwangju Uprising, in which government soldiers firing on student protesters led to days of deadly fighting, is one of the most significant events in recent Korean history. In this powerful documentary, Yi Ji-sang combines archival footage with reenactments based on the actual experiences of everyday people—factory workers, waitresses, and college students, for example—who took up arms against the military. As the director is determined not to show the ultimate symbol of violence, no guns actually appear in the film; the actors only pantomime their presence. The film is challenging on both an aesthetic and political level, as Korea today grapples with the return of the kind of totalitarian impulses that brought about the tragedy of Gwangju more than thirty years ago. (Dir.: Yi Ji-sang, Korea, 2015, 121 min. DCP, Korean with English subtitles). Venue: American History Museum. Event Location: Warner Brothers Theater. Cost: Free and open to the public. Admission is first-come, first-served. Auditorium doors open 30 minutes before showtime. Saturday, June 18, 2016, 3:00 PM.

Korean Film Festival: "Under the Sun"

This screening is held at AFI Silver Theatre.  Given permission by the authorities to make a film about a Pyongyang family, director Vitaly Mansky soon realized that his government minders were turning his documentary into a highly manipulated fiction. So he simply left the camera running between takes to capture them staging scenes, feeding lines, and cajoling performances out of Mansky’s supposedly “typical” subjects. This controversial, award-winning film is a remarkable and chilling glimpse behind North Korea’s propaganda curtain. (Dir.: Vitaly Mansky, Russia/Germany/Czech Republic/Latvia/North Korea, 2015, 106 min. DCP, Korean with English subtitles) Images courtesy Icarus Films. Co-sponsor: In collaboration with AFI Docs (afi.com/afidocs), we present two fascinating recent documentaries about North Korea. Event Location: AFI Silver Theatre. Cost: Tickets can be purchased in advance or on the day of the film, both at the venue and online. The box office opens 30 minutes before the first film of the day. Continues: Sunday, June 26, 7:45 pm, Landmark E Street Cinema. Thursday, June 23, 2016, 2:00 PM.

Korean Film Festival: "The Lovers and the Despot"

This screening is held at AFI Silver Theatre. This film tells the true story of Shin Sang-ok, a young, ambitious South Korean filmmaker, and the actress Choi Eun-hee (both of whom were guests at the first Korean Film Festival DC in 2004). Shin and Choi met and fell in love in 1950s postwar Korea. In the ‘70s, having risen to the top of Korean society with his successful films, Choi was kidnapped by North Korean agents and taken to meet Kim Jong-il. While searching for Choi, Shin also was kidnapped. After five years of imprisonment, the couple was reunited by the movie-obsessed Kim, who declared them his personal filmmakers. Choi and Shin planned their escape, but not before producing seventeen feature films for the dictator and gaining his trust in the process. (Dir.: Robert Cannan and Ross Adam, United States, 2016, 94 min. DCP, English, Korean and Japanese with English subtitles). Co-sponsor: In collaboration with AFI Docs (afi.com/afidocs), we present two fascinating recent documentaries about North Korea. Event Location: AFI Silver Theatre. Cost: Tickets can be purchased in advance or on the day of the film, both at the venue and online. The box office opens 30 minutes before the first film of the day. Continues: Saturday, June 25, 10 pm, Landmark E Street Cinema. Friday, June 24, 2016, 4:45 PM.

Korean Film Festival: "The Lovers and the Despot"

This screening is held at Landmark E Street Cinema.  This film tells the true story of Shin Sang-ok, a young, ambitious South Korean filmmaker, and the actress Choi Eun-hee (both of whom were guests at the first Korean Film Festival DC in 2004). Shin and Choi met and fell in love in 1950s postwar Korea. In the ‘70s, having risen to the top of Korean society with his successful films, Choi was kidnapped by North Korean agents and taken to meet Kim Jong-il. While searching for Choi, Shin also was kidnapped. After five years of imprisonment, the couple was reunited by the movie-obsessed Kim, who declared them his personal filmmakers. Choi and Shin planned their escape, but not before producing seventeen feature films for the dictator and gaining his trust in the process. (Dir.: Robert Cannan and Ross Adam, United States, 2016, 94 min. DCP, English, Korean and Japanese with English subtitles). Co-sponsor: In collaboration with AFI Docs (afi.com/afidocs), we present two fascinating recent documentaries about North Korea. Event Location: Landmark E Street Cinema. Purchase Tickets: http://silver.afi.com/Browsing/Movies/Details/m-0100000728. Saturday, June 25, 2016, 10:00 PM.

Korean Film Festival: "Under the Sun"

This screening is held at Landmark E Street Cinema.  Given permission by the authorities to make a film about a Pyongyang family, director Vitaly Mansky soon realized that his government minders were turning his documentary into a highly manipulated fiction. So he simply left the camera running between takes to capture them staging scenes, feeding lines, and cajoling performances out of Mansky’s supposedly “typical” subjects. This controversial, award-winning film is a remarkable and chilling glimpse behind North Korea’s propaganda curtain. (Dir.: Vitaly Mansky, Russia/Germany/Czech Republic/Latvia/North Korea, 2015, 106 min. DCP, Korean with English subtitles) Images courtesy Icarus Films. Co-sponsor: In collaboration with AFI Docs (afi.com/afidocs), we present two fascinating recent documentaries about North Korea. Event Location: Landmark E Street Cinema. Purchase Tickets: http://silver.afi.com/Browsing/Movies/Details/m-0100000712. Sunday, June 26, 2016, 7:45 PM.

Hong Kong Film Festival: "Happiness"

This screening is held at National Museum of American History, Warner Brothers Theater. World premiere! In person: Kara Wai, actress; Carlos Chan, actor Kara Wai gives a powerful performance in the world premiere of Andy Lo’s directorial debut. In her role as a woman suffering from Alzheimer’s, she takes under her wing an aimless young man (Chan) who has come to Hong Kong to look for the father who abandoned him. Together these wounded souls make a family of their own in this touching drama from the screenwriter of Crazy n’ The City and My Name is Fame. Followed by a Q&A and an autograph signing with its two stars. (Dir.: Andy Lo, Hong Kong, 2016, 113 min. DCP, Cantonese with English subtitles). Event Location: National Museum of American History, Warner Brothers Theater. Cost: Admission is first-come, first-served. Auditorium doors open 30 minutes before showtime. Friday, July 15, 2016, 7:00 PM.

Hong Kong Film Festival: "My Young Auntie"

This screening is held at National Museum of American History, Warner Brothers Theater. In person: Kara Wai, actress Kara Wai won her first Hong Kong Film Award for her effervescent performance in this delightful kung fu comedy. She plays a young student who marries her dying teacher to keep his inheritance away from his untrustworthy relatives. When she visits her new relatives, traditional notions of familial hierarchy are upended—and her dazzling kung fu skills come in handy when a bunch of bad guys show up to steal the family property. © Licensed by Celestial Pictures Limited. All rights reserved. 版權由天映娛樂有限公司 (Dir.: Lau Kar-Leung, Hong Kong, 1981, 100 min. Digibeta, Cantonese with Chinese and English subtitles). Event Location: National Museum of American History, Warner Brothers Theater. Cost: Admission is first-come, first-served. Auditorium doors open 30 minutes before showtime. Sunday, July 17, 2016, 2:00 PM.

Hong Kong Film Festival: "The Mermaid"

This screening is held at National Museum of American History, Warner Brothers Theater. 3D screening! The Mermaid is an “exhilarating, bizarre, good-hearted, blatantly obvious sci-fi-fantasy-slapstick eco-fable” (Glenn Kenny, New York Times) from Hong Kong comedy king Stephen Chow (Kung Fu Hustle, Shaolin Soccer). It is also the highest-grossing Chinese film of all time. Since it made only a brief appearance on American screens, we’re bringing it back for an encore—in 3D, no less. When an island development threatens their habitat, a mermaid family sends one of its number (charming newcomer Jelly Lin) to assassinate the greedy entrepreneur. Instead of using her sack of weaponized sea urchins to kill him, she falls in love. Chow’s brand of absurdist humor is on full display in this wild ride that covers all the comedy bases, from rom-com to high-flying action, but it carries a sincere environmental message at its heart. (Dir.: Stephen Chow, China/Hong Kong, 2016, 94 min. DCP, Mandarin with English… Event Location: National Museum of American History, Warner Brothers Theater. Cost: Admission is first-come, first-served. Auditorium doors open 30 minutes before showtime. Saturday, July 23, 2016, 2:00 PM.

Hong Kong Film Festival: "Ten Years"

This screening is held at National Museum of American History, Warner Brothers Theater. See the micro-budget sci-fi omnibus that beat Star Wars: The Force Awakens at the Hong Kong box office. Chinese authorities considered Ten Years so dangerous that they banned it from theaters and even blacked out broadcast of the Hong Kong Film Awards simply because it was nominated. Made for the equivalent of about $70,000, this collection of five short films, each by a different director, speculates darkly on what Hong Kong will look like in 2025. A false-flag assassination plot and a children’s brigade that keeps tabs on subversive adults are among the ominous predictions. The idea for the film germinated before the 2014 Hong Kong street protests, but all five of its parts channel the energy and anxiety of the Umbrella Movement. (Dir.: Ng La-leung, Jevons Au, Chow Kwun-Wai, Fei-Pang Wong, and Kwok Zune, Hong Kong, 2015, 104 min. DCP, Cantonese with Chinese and English subtitles). Event Location: National Museum of American History, Warner Brothers Theater. Cost: Admission is first-come, first-served. Auditorium doors open 30 minutes before showtime. Sunday, July 24, 2016, 2:00 PM.

Hong Kong Film Festival: "Office"

This screening is held at National Museum of American History, Warner Brothers Theater. 3D screening! According to the New York Times’ Manohla Dargis, if Johnnie To “were an American, his name would fall from lips as easily as Martin Scorsese’s.” This masterful director of more than fifty films, including such classics as Election and PTU, has never applied his signature fluid camerawork to a full-blown musical . . . until now. Based on Design for Living, a popular stage play by Sylvia Chang (who stars in the movie alongside the eternally suave Chow Yun-fat), Office depicts the ups and downs—romantic and financial—of a financial firm’s staff during 2008’s global economic turmoil. Full of sparkling song and dance numbers performed in an abstract set of glass walls and tubes of light, this “visually inventive romp . . . charmingly mines humor, romance and no shortage of eccentric lyrics from the world of spreadsheets and stock portfolios” (Justin Chang, Variety). (Dir.: Johnnie To, Hong Kong/China,… Event Location: National Museum of American History, Warner Brothers Theater. Cost: Admission is first-come, first-served. Auditorium doors open 30 minutes before showtime. Saturday, July 30, 2016, 2:00 PM.

Hong Kong Film Festival: "Ip Man 3"

This screening is held at National Museum of American History, Warner Brothers Theater. Donnie Yen versus Mike Tyson? Yes, please! In the third installment of this popular franchise, Yen reprises his role as the real-life kung fu master best known for having trained a young Bruce Lee (as seen here in the first of many fight scenes choreographed by the legendary Yuen Woo-ping). In this edition, which was nominated for eight Hong Kong Film Awards, Ip is settling into life as a family man, but he’s soon called to protect Hong Kong from a ruthless American businessman (with surprisingly strong boxing skills) who is trying to make a land grab. Yen brings his customary grace and gravitas to the title role, while director Wilson Yip suffuses the film with rich period detail. (Dir.: Wilson Yip, Hong Kong, 2015, 105 min. DCP, Cantonese with English subtitles) Images courtesy of Well Go USA. Event Location: National Museum of American History, Warner Brothers Theater. Cost: Admission is first-come, first-served. Auditorium doors open 30 minutes before showtime. Sunday, July 31, 2016, 2:00 PM.

Hong Kong Film Festival: "The Blade"

This screening is held at National Museum of American History, Warner Brothers Theater. The Blade is Tsui Hark’s masterful tribute to the martial arts films of his youth. A reimagining of director Chang Cheh’s 1967 wuxia landmark The One-Armed Swordsman, this phantasmagoric action film moves like an out-of-control freight train. Featuring rapid cutting, berserk camera movement, frenetic choreography, and compositions bursting with detail, The Blade shows one of the world's best directors at the top of his game. Description courtesy of Subway Cinema. (Dir.: Tsui Hark, Hong Kong, 1995, 100 min. 35mm, Cantonese with English subtitles). Event Location: National Museum of American History, Warner Brothers Theater. Cost: Admission is first-come, first-served. Auditorium doors open 30 minutes before showtime. Saturday, August 6, 2016, 1:00 PM.

Hong Kong Film Festival: "A Terra-Cotta Warrior"

This screening is held at National Museum of American History, Warner Brothers Theater. Inspired by everyone from Kurosawa to Spielberg, A Terra-Cotta Warrior is a feast for the senses. Two and a half years in the making, it was one of the most exquisite fantasy films to come out of Hong Kong in the 1990s, featuring a unique blend of romance, swashbuckling action, and comedy.  Zhang Yimou and Gong Li—then China’s cinematic power couple—star as an imperial soldier and the woman who brings him back to life after he’s spent centuries encased in clay in the emperor’s tomb. Description courtesy of Subway Cinema. (Dir.: Ching Siu-tung, Hong Kong, 1990, 97 min. 35mm, Cantonese with English subtitles). Event Location: National Museum of American History, Warner Brothers Theater. Cost: Admission is first-come, first-served. Auditorium doors open 30 minutes before showtime. Saturday, August 6, 2016, 3:30 PM.

Film: "Mountains May Depart"

This screening is held at National Museum of American History, Warner Brothers Theater. Mainland master Jia Zhangke scales new heights with Mountains May Depart. At once an intimate drama and a decades-spanning epic, Jia's new film also is an intensely moving study of how China's economic boom and the resulting materialism have affected the bonds of family, tradition, and love. The “cumulative impact,” writes Scott Foundas in Variety, is “enormously touching, highlighted by Jia’s rapturous image-making and a luminous central performance by the director’s regular muse (and wife), Zhao Tao.” (Dir.: Jia Zhangke, China/France/Japan, 2015, 131 min. DCP, Cantonese, Mandarin and English with English subtitles). Event Location: National Museum of American History, Warner Brothers Theater. Cost: Admission is first-come, first-served. Auditorium doors open 30 minutes before showtime. Saturday, August 20, 2016, 2:00 PM.

Film: "Jia Zhangke: A Guy from Fenyang"

This screening is held at the National Portrait Gallery, Nan Tucker McEvoy Auditorium. Brazilian filmmaker Walter Salles (Central Station, The Motorcycle Diaries) accompanies the prolific Chinese director Jia Zhangke on a walk down memory lane as Jia revisits his hometown and other locations from his ever-growing body of work. At each location, the two directors visit Jia's family, friends, and former colleagues. Their conversations range from his mother's tales of Jia as a young boy to amusing remembrances of schooldays and film shoots to memories of his father. They also discuss the fact that, if not for pirated DVDs, much of Jia's work would go unseen in China. The confluence of storytelling, intellect, and politics informing all of Jia's work is brought to light in this lovely, intimate portrait. (Dir.: Walter Salles, France/Brazil, 2014, 99 min. Blu-ray, Mandarin with English subtitles) Images copyright Walter Salles. Event Location: National Portrait Gallery, Nan Tucker McEvoy Auditorium. Sunday, August 21, 2016, 4:30 PM.