The Freedom Trail

American Revolutionary History, but not the same old story.

tours, museum, tea party, boston massacre

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Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Thursday, July 18, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Revolution's Edge (An Original Play at Old North Church)

The critically acclaimed play Revolution’s Edge returns to the Old North Church this spring! Written especially for Old North by Plays in Place, this gripping historical drama was a smash hit with audiences last year and was profiled by AP News, Boston.com. WBUR, and WGBH. You can watch a trailer for the play here: https://youtu.be/yEDH1DApDn8?si=CIsRKvxP5E96xUzz Revolution’s Edge takes us to the afternoon of April 18, 1775, hours before the “two if by sea” signal lanterns would shine from Old North’s steeple. With war on the horizon, Old North’s Loyalist rector, the Rev. Dr. Mather Byles, Jr. is pushed to “resign” his post. As Byles and Cato (an African man enslaved by Byles) prepare to leave the church for the final time, they encounter Capt. John Pulling, Jr. a prominent member of the church congregation, ardent Patriot, and friend of Paul Revere. These three men share a faith but have very different beliefs concerning the right path ahead for themselves, their families, and the colonies. Their conv… Category: Performing Arts. Cost: 20. Thursday, July 18, 2024, 6:00 PM – 7:00 PM. Old North Church. For more info visit www.oldnorth.com.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Friday, July 19, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Revolution's Edge (An Original Play at Old North Church)

The critically acclaimed play Revolution’s Edge returns to the Old North Church this spring! Written especially for Old North by Plays in Place, this gripping historical drama was a smash hit with audiences last year and was profiled by AP News, Boston.com. WBUR, and WGBH. You can watch a trailer for the play here: https://youtu.be/yEDH1DApDn8?si=CIsRKvxP5E96xUzz Revolution’s Edge takes us to the afternoon of April 18, 1775, hours before the “two if by sea” signal lanterns would shine from Old North’s steeple. With war on the horizon, Old North’s Loyalist rector, the Rev. Dr. Mather Byles, Jr. is pushed to “resign” his post. As Byles and Cato (an African man enslaved by Byles) prepare to leave the church for the final time, they encounter Capt. John Pulling, Jr. a prominent member of the church congregation, ardent Patriot, and friend of Paul Revere. These three men share a faith but have very different beliefs concerning the right path ahead for themselves, their families, and the colonies. Their conv… Category: Performing Arts. Cost: 20. Friday, July 19, 2024, 6:00 PM – 7:00 PM. Old North Church. For more info visit www.oldnorth.com.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Saturday, July 20, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Hammered Dulcimer Concert

Award-winning musician Dave Neiman plays jigs, reels, and Baroque and Renaissance tunes that Paul Revere and his family may have enjoyed. Category: Concerts & Music. Cost: Event is included in the cost of admission to the Paul Revere House: $6.00/adult, $5.50/college students and seniors 62+, $1.00/child 5-17 years old. Saturday, July 20, 2024, 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM. The Paul Revere House 19 North Square Boston, MA 02113.

Revolution's Edge (An Original Play at Old North Church)

The critically acclaimed play Revolution’s Edge returns to the Old North Church this spring! Written especially for Old North by Plays in Place, this gripping historical drama was a smash hit with audiences last year and was profiled by AP News, Boston.com. WBUR, and WGBH. You can watch a trailer for the play here: https://youtu.be/yEDH1DApDn8?si=CIsRKvxP5E96xUzz Revolution’s Edge takes us to the afternoon of April 18, 1775, hours before the “two if by sea” signal lanterns would shine from Old North’s steeple. With war on the horizon, Old North’s Loyalist rector, the Rev. Dr. Mather Byles, Jr. is pushed to “resign” his post. As Byles and Cato (an African man enslaved by Byles) prepare to leave the church for the final time, they encounter Capt. John Pulling, Jr. a prominent member of the church congregation, ardent Patriot, and friend of Paul Revere. These three men share a faith but have very different beliefs concerning the right path ahead for themselves, their families, and the colonies. Their conv… Category: Performing Arts. Cost: 20. Saturday, July 20, 2024, 6:00 PM – 7:00 PM. Old North Church. For more info visit www.oldnorth.com.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Sunday, July 21, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Monday, July 22, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Tuesday, July 23, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Wednesday, July 24, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Revolution's Edge (An Original Play at Old North Church)

The critically acclaimed play Revolution’s Edge returns to the Old North Church this spring! Written especially for Old North by Plays in Place, this gripping historical drama was a smash hit with audiences last year and was profiled by AP News, Boston.com. WBUR, and WGBH. You can watch a trailer for the play here: https://youtu.be/yEDH1DApDn8?si=CIsRKvxP5E96xUzz Revolution’s Edge takes us to the afternoon of April 18, 1775, hours before the “two if by sea” signal lanterns would shine from Old North’s steeple. With war on the horizon, Old North’s Loyalist rector, the Rev. Dr. Mather Byles, Jr. is pushed to “resign” his post. As Byles and Cato (an African man enslaved by Byles) prepare to leave the church for the final time, they encounter Capt. John Pulling, Jr. a prominent member of the church congregation, ardent Patriot, and friend of Paul Revere. These three men share a faith but have very different beliefs concerning the right path ahead for themselves, their families, and the colonies. Their conv… Category: Performing Arts. Cost: 20. Wednesday, July 24, 2024, 6:00 PM – 7:00 PM. Old North Church. For more info visit www.oldnorth.com.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Thursday, July 25, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Revolution's Edge (An Original Play at Old North Church)

The critically acclaimed play Revolution’s Edge returns to the Old North Church this spring! Written especially for Old North by Plays in Place, this gripping historical drama was a smash hit with audiences last year and was profiled by AP News, Boston.com. WBUR, and WGBH. You can watch a trailer for the play here: https://youtu.be/yEDH1DApDn8?si=CIsRKvxP5E96xUzz Revolution’s Edge takes us to the afternoon of April 18, 1775, hours before the “two if by sea” signal lanterns would shine from Old North’s steeple. With war on the horizon, Old North’s Loyalist rector, the Rev. Dr. Mather Byles, Jr. is pushed to “resign” his post. As Byles and Cato (an African man enslaved by Byles) prepare to leave the church for the final time, they encounter Capt. John Pulling, Jr. a prominent member of the church congregation, ardent Patriot, and friend of Paul Revere. These three men share a faith but have very different beliefs concerning the right path ahead for themselves, their families, and the colonies. Their conv… Category: Performing Arts. Cost: 20. Thursday, July 25, 2024, 6:00 PM – 7:00 PM. Old North Church. For more info visit www.oldnorth.com.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Friday, July 26, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Revolution's Edge (An Original Play at Old North Church)

The critically acclaimed play Revolution’s Edge returns to the Old North Church this spring! Written especially for Old North by Plays in Place, this gripping historical drama was a smash hit with audiences last year and was profiled by AP News, Boston.com. WBUR, and WGBH. You can watch a trailer for the play here: https://youtu.be/yEDH1DApDn8?si=CIsRKvxP5E96xUzz Revolution’s Edge takes us to the afternoon of April 18, 1775, hours before the “two if by sea” signal lanterns would shine from Old North’s steeple. With war on the horizon, Old North’s Loyalist rector, the Rev. Dr. Mather Byles, Jr. is pushed to “resign” his post. As Byles and Cato (an African man enslaved by Byles) prepare to leave the church for the final time, they encounter Capt. John Pulling, Jr. a prominent member of the church congregation, ardent Patriot, and friend of Paul Revere. These three men share a faith but have very different beliefs concerning the right path ahead for themselves, their families, and the colonies. Their conv… Category: Performing Arts. Cost: 20. Friday, July 26, 2024, 6:00 PM – 7:00 PM. Old North Church. For more info visit www.oldnorth.com.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Saturday, July 27, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

John Adams: The Colossus of Independence

Hear from John Adams himself as he discusses his earliest beginnings in Braintree through his days as delegate of the Continental Congress and foreign ambassador. Hear his opinions of his contemporaries and how he longs to be home with his "dearest friend," Abigail, and their children. Mr. Adams' singular wit is appealing to children and adults! Category: Concerts & Music. Performing Arts. Cost: Event is included in the cost of admission to the Paul Revere House: $6.00/adult, $5.50/college students and seniors 62+, $1.00/child 5-17 years old. Saturday, July 27, 2024, 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM. The Paul Revere House 19 North Square Boston, MA 02113.

Revolution's Edge (An Original Play at Old North Church)

The critically acclaimed play Revolution’s Edge returns to the Old North Church this spring! Written especially for Old North by Plays in Place, this gripping historical drama was a smash hit with audiences last year and was profiled by AP News, Boston.com. WBUR, and WGBH. You can watch a trailer for the play here: https://youtu.be/yEDH1DApDn8?si=CIsRKvxP5E96xUzz Revolution’s Edge takes us to the afternoon of April 18, 1775, hours before the “two if by sea” signal lanterns would shine from Old North’s steeple. With war on the horizon, Old North’s Loyalist rector, the Rev. Dr. Mather Byles, Jr. is pushed to “resign” his post. As Byles and Cato (an African man enslaved by Byles) prepare to leave the church for the final time, they encounter Capt. John Pulling, Jr. a prominent member of the church congregation, ardent Patriot, and friend of Paul Revere. These three men share a faith but have very different beliefs concerning the right path ahead for themselves, their families, and the colonies. Their conv… Category: Performing Arts. Cost: 20. Saturday, July 27, 2024, 6:00 PM – 7:00 PM. Old North Church. For more info visit www.oldnorth.com.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Sunday, July 28, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

The Many Rides of Paul Revere

Did you know Paul Revere traveled far from home many times as a courier in the service of the Committee of Safety and the Sons of Liberty? In May of 1774 he traveled to New York & Philadelphia bearing news of the Intolerable Acts. Learn about the details of some of his other trips beyond the short, best known one to Lexington as Michael Lepage portrays Boston’s favorite Patriot! Category: Concerts & Music. Performing Arts. Cost: Event is included in the cost of admission to the Paul Revere House: $6.00/adult, $5.50/college students and seniors 62+, $1.00/child 5-17 years old. Sunday, July 28, 2024, 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM. The Paul Revere House 19 North Square Boston, MA 02113.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Monday, July 29, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Tuesday, July 30, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Wednesday, July 31, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Revolution's Edge (An Original Play at Old North Church)

The critically acclaimed play Revolution’s Edge returns to the Old North Church this spring! Written especially for Old North by Plays in Place, this gripping historical drama was a smash hit with audiences last year and was profiled by AP News, Boston.com. WBUR, and WGBH. You can watch a trailer for the play here: https://youtu.be/yEDH1DApDn8?si=CIsRKvxP5E96xUzz Revolution’s Edge takes us to the afternoon of April 18, 1775, hours before the “two if by sea” signal lanterns would shine from Old North’s steeple. With war on the horizon, Old North’s Loyalist rector, the Rev. Dr. Mather Byles, Jr. is pushed to “resign” his post. As Byles and Cato (an African man enslaved by Byles) prepare to leave the church for the final time, they encounter Capt. John Pulling, Jr. a prominent member of the church congregation, ardent Patriot, and friend of Paul Revere. These three men share a faith but have very different beliefs concerning the right path ahead for themselves, their families, and the colonies. Their conv… Category: Performing Arts. Cost: 20. Wednesday, July 31, 2024, 6:00 PM – 7:00 PM. Old North Church. For more info visit www.oldnorth.com.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Thursday, August 1, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Revolution's Edge (An Original Play at Old North Church)

The critically acclaimed play Revolution’s Edge returns to the Old North Church this spring! Written especially for Old North by Plays in Place, this gripping historical drama was a smash hit with audiences last year and was profiled by AP News, Boston.com. WBUR, and WGBH. You can watch a trailer for the play here: https://youtu.be/yEDH1DApDn8?si=CIsRKvxP5E96xUzz Revolution’s Edge takes us to the afternoon of April 18, 1775, hours before the “two if by sea” signal lanterns would shine from Old North’s steeple. With war on the horizon, Old North’s Loyalist rector, the Rev. Dr. Mather Byles, Jr. is pushed to “resign” his post. As Byles and Cato (an African man enslaved by Byles) prepare to leave the church for the final time, they encounter Capt. John Pulling, Jr. a prominent member of the church congregation, ardent Patriot, and friend of Paul Revere. These three men share a faith but have very different beliefs concerning the right path ahead for themselves, their families, and the colonies. Their conv… Category: Performing Arts. Cost: 20. Thursday, August 1, 2024, 6:00 PM – 7:00 PM. Old North Church. For more info visit www.oldnorth.com.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Friday, August 2, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Revolution's Edge (An Original Play at Old North Church)

The critically acclaimed play Revolution’s Edge returns to the Old North Church this spring! Written especially for Old North by Plays in Place, this gripping historical drama was a smash hit with audiences last year and was profiled by AP News, Boston.com. WBUR, and WGBH. You can watch a trailer for the play here: https://youtu.be/yEDH1DApDn8?si=CIsRKvxP5E96xUzz Revolution’s Edge takes us to the afternoon of April 18, 1775, hours before the “two if by sea” signal lanterns would shine from Old North’s steeple. With war on the horizon, Old North’s Loyalist rector, the Rev. Dr. Mather Byles, Jr. is pushed to “resign” his post. As Byles and Cato (an African man enslaved by Byles) prepare to leave the church for the final time, they encounter Capt. John Pulling, Jr. a prominent member of the church congregation, ardent Patriot, and friend of Paul Revere. These three men share a faith but have very different beliefs concerning the right path ahead for themselves, their families, and the colonies. Their conv… Category: Performing Arts. Cost: 20. Friday, August 2, 2024, 6:00 PM – 7:00 PM. Old North Church. For more info visit www.oldnorth.com.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Saturday, August 3, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Revolution's Edge (An Original Play at Old North Church)

The critically acclaimed play Revolution’s Edge returns to the Old North Church this spring! Written especially for Old North by Plays in Place, this gripping historical drama was a smash hit with audiences last year and was profiled by AP News, Boston.com. WBUR, and WGBH. You can watch a trailer for the play here: https://youtu.be/yEDH1DApDn8?si=CIsRKvxP5E96xUzz Revolution’s Edge takes us to the afternoon of April 18, 1775, hours before the “two if by sea” signal lanterns would shine from Old North’s steeple. With war on the horizon, Old North’s Loyalist rector, the Rev. Dr. Mather Byles, Jr. is pushed to “resign” his post. As Byles and Cato (an African man enslaved by Byles) prepare to leave the church for the final time, they encounter Capt. John Pulling, Jr. a prominent member of the church congregation, ardent Patriot, and friend of Paul Revere. These three men share a faith but have very different beliefs concerning the right path ahead for themselves, their families, and the colonies. Their conv… Category: Performing Arts. Cost: 20. Saturday, August 3, 2024, 6:00 PM – 7:00 PM. Old North Church. For more info visit www.oldnorth.com.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Sunday, August 4, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Monday, August 5, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Tuesday, August 6, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Wednesday, August 7, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Revolution's Edge (An Original Play at Old North Church)

The critically acclaimed play Revolution’s Edge returns to the Old North Church this spring! Written especially for Old North by Plays in Place, this gripping historical drama was a smash hit with audiences last year and was profiled by AP News, Boston.com. WBUR, and WGBH. You can watch a trailer for the play here: https://youtu.be/yEDH1DApDn8?si=CIsRKvxP5E96xUzz Revolution’s Edge takes us to the afternoon of April 18, 1775, hours before the “two if by sea” signal lanterns would shine from Old North’s steeple. With war on the horizon, Old North’s Loyalist rector, the Rev. Dr. Mather Byles, Jr. is pushed to “resign” his post. As Byles and Cato (an African man enslaved by Byles) prepare to leave the church for the final time, they encounter Capt. John Pulling, Jr. a prominent member of the church congregation, ardent Patriot, and friend of Paul Revere. These three men share a faith but have very different beliefs concerning the right path ahead for themselves, their families, and the colonies. Their conv… Category: Performing Arts. Cost: 20. Wednesday, August 7, 2024, 6:00 PM – 7:00 PM. Old North Church. For more info visit www.oldnorth.com.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Thursday, August 8, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Revolution's Edge (An Original Play at Old North Church)

The critically acclaimed play Revolution’s Edge returns to the Old North Church this spring! Written especially for Old North by Plays in Place, this gripping historical drama was a smash hit with audiences last year and was profiled by AP News, Boston.com. WBUR, and WGBH. You can watch a trailer for the play here: https://youtu.be/yEDH1DApDn8?si=CIsRKvxP5E96xUzz Revolution’s Edge takes us to the afternoon of April 18, 1775, hours before the “two if by sea” signal lanterns would shine from Old North’s steeple. With war on the horizon, Old North’s Loyalist rector, the Rev. Dr. Mather Byles, Jr. is pushed to “resign” his post. As Byles and Cato (an African man enslaved by Byles) prepare to leave the church for the final time, they encounter Capt. John Pulling, Jr. a prominent member of the church congregation, ardent Patriot, and friend of Paul Revere. These three men share a faith but have very different beliefs concerning the right path ahead for themselves, their families, and the colonies. Their conv… Category: Performing Arts. Cost: 20. Thursday, August 8, 2024, 6:00 PM – 7:00 PM. Old North Church. For more info visit www.oldnorth.com.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Friday, August 9, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Revolution's Edge (An Original Play at Old North Church)

The critically acclaimed play Revolution’s Edge returns to the Old North Church this spring! Written especially for Old North by Plays in Place, this gripping historical drama was a smash hit with audiences last year and was profiled by AP News, Boston.com. WBUR, and WGBH. You can watch a trailer for the play here: https://youtu.be/yEDH1DApDn8?si=CIsRKvxP5E96xUzz Revolution’s Edge takes us to the afternoon of April 18, 1775, hours before the “two if by sea” signal lanterns would shine from Old North’s steeple. With war on the horizon, Old North’s Loyalist rector, the Rev. Dr. Mather Byles, Jr. is pushed to “resign” his post. As Byles and Cato (an African man enslaved by Byles) prepare to leave the church for the final time, they encounter Capt. John Pulling, Jr. a prominent member of the church congregation, ardent Patriot, and friend of Paul Revere. These three men share a faith but have very different beliefs concerning the right path ahead for themselves, their families, and the colonies. Their conv… Category: Performing Arts. Cost: 20. Friday, August 9, 2024, 6:00 PM – 7:00 PM. Old North Church. For more info visit www.oldnorth.com.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Saturday, August 10, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

The Tailor’s Craft

Clothing historian Henry Cooke takes on the role of an early Boston tailor. Watch as he “takes the measure” of visitors, then sits cross-legged, fashioning waistcoats from luxurious fabrics and “slops” from coarse weaves. Category: Arts & Crafts. Performing Arts. Cost: Event is included in the cost of admission to the Paul Revere House: $6.00/adult, $5.50/college students and seniors 62+, $1.00/child 5-17 years old. Saturday, August 10, 2024, 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM. The Paul Revere House 19 North Square Boston, MA 02113.

Revolution's Edge (An Original Play at Old North Church)

The critically acclaimed play Revolution’s Edge returns to the Old North Church this spring! Written especially for Old North by Plays in Place, this gripping historical drama was a smash hit with audiences last year and was profiled by AP News, Boston.com. WBUR, and WGBH. You can watch a trailer for the play here: https://youtu.be/yEDH1DApDn8?si=CIsRKvxP5E96xUzz Revolution’s Edge takes us to the afternoon of April 18, 1775, hours before the “two if by sea” signal lanterns would shine from Old North’s steeple. With war on the horizon, Old North’s Loyalist rector, the Rev. Dr. Mather Byles, Jr. is pushed to “resign” his post. As Byles and Cato (an African man enslaved by Byles) prepare to leave the church for the final time, they encounter Capt. John Pulling, Jr. a prominent member of the church congregation, ardent Patriot, and friend of Paul Revere. These three men share a faith but have very different beliefs concerning the right path ahead for themselves, their families, and the colonies. Their conv… Category: Performing Arts. Cost: 20. Saturday, August 10, 2024, 6:00 PM – 7:00 PM. Old North Church. For more info visit www.oldnorth.com.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Sunday, August 11, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Monday, August 12, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Tuesday, August 13, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Wednesday, August 14, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Thursday, August 15, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Friday, August 16, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Saturday, August 17, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Hammered Dulcimer Concert

Award-winning musician Dave Neiman plays jigs, reels, and Baroque and Renaissance tunes that Paul Revere and his family may have enjoyed. Category: Concerts & Music. Cost: Event is included in the cost of admission to the Paul Revere House: $6.00/adult, $5.50/college students and seniors 62+, $1.00/child 5-17 years old. Saturday, August 17, 2024, 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM. The Paul Revere House 19 North Square Boston, MA 02113.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Sunday, August 18, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Monday, August 19, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Tuesday, August 20, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Wednesday, August 21, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Thursday, August 22, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Friday, August 23, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Saturday, August 24, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Patriot Fife and Drum

Enjoy a lively concert of music that accompanied colonists as they marched, danced, wooed their beloveds, and waged war. David Vose and Sue Walko provide fascinating insight into each selection they perform. Category: Concerts & Music. Cost: Event is included in the cost of admission to the Paul Revere House: $6.00/adult, $5.50/college students and seniors 62+, $1.00/child 5-17 years old. Saturday, August 24, 2024, 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM. The Paul Revere House 19 North Square Boston, MA 02113.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Sunday, August 25, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Monday, August 26, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Tuesday, August 27, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Wednesday, August 28, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Thursday, August 29, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Friday, August 30, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Saturday, August 31, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Meet Harriet, Daughter of Paul Revere

Diane Lent brings to life Harriet Revere, one of Paul Revere’s 16 children. Join her in reminiscing about her father’s dramatic life, the adventures of her many siblings, nieces, and nephews, and growing up in the historic North End. Category: Performing Arts. Cost: Event is included in the cost of admission to the Paul Revere House: $6.00/adult, $5.50/college students and seniors 62+, $1.00/child 5-17 years old. Saturday, August 31, 2024, 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM. The Paul Revere House 19 North Square Boston, MA 02113.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Sunday, September 1, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Monday, September 2, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Tuesday, September 3, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Wednesday, September 4, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Thursday, September 5, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Friday, September 6, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Saturday, September 7, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Sunday, September 8, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Monday, September 9, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Tuesday, September 10, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Wednesday, September 11, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Thursday, September 12, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Friday, September 13, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Saturday, September 14, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Sunday, September 15, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Monday, September 16, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Tuesday, September 17, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Wednesday, September 18, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Thursday, September 19, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Friday, September 20, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Saturday, September 21, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Sunday, September 22, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Monday, September 23, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Tuesday, September 24, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Wednesday, September 25, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Thursday, September 26, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Friday, September 27, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Saturday, September 28, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Sunday, September 29, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Monday, September 30, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Tuesday, October 1, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Wednesday, October 2, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Thursday, October 3, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Friday, October 4, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Saturday, October 5, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Sunday, October 6, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Monday, October 7, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Tuesday, October 8, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Wednesday, October 9, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Thursday, October 10, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Friday, October 11, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Saturday, October 12, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Sunday, October 13, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Monday, October 14, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Tuesday, October 15, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Wednesday, October 16, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.

Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party

On December 16, 1773, radical Bostonians threw 340 crates of tea into Boston Harbor to protest what they saw as unfair taxation by the British Parliament. Known today as the “Boston Tea Party,” the event known to contemporaries as “the destruction of the tea” was highly divisive, drawing criticism from figures like Benjamin Franklin and George Washington. It would take almost a century for this event to transform from an embarrassing act of property destruction to a celebrated national origin story. The Boston Tea Party was not the first instance of property destruction in what would become the United States, and it certainly was not the last. Explore how Americans have used vandalism as a tool of protest throughout the centuries in Impassioned Destruction: Politics, Vandalism, and the Boston Tea Party. Open daily at the Old State House, this new exhibit invites visitors to consider other acts of property destruction in the context of the Tea Party. When, if ever, do you believe it is justified to destro… Category: Lectures. Cost: Adults $15, Seniors/Students $14, Children (6-12) $8, Veterans and Members FREE. Thursday, October 17, 2024, 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM. Old State House. For more info visit www.revolutionaryspaces.org.