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The Religion of White Rage

This event is free and open to the public, but registration is required. Please join us for a panel discussion of The Religion of White Rage with the book’s three editors, as part of the Center’s series on “Race, Religion, and Nationalism.” This book sheds light on the phenomenon of white rage, and maps out the uneasy relationship between white anxiety, religious fervor, American identity, and perceived black racial progress. Among other things, the book examines the sociological construct of the “white laborer,” whose concerns and beliefs, this book argues, can be understood as religious in foundation. The book argues further that white religious fervor correlates to notions of perceived white loss and perceived black progress. Stephen C. Finley is Associate Professor of Religious Studies and African & African American Studies and Director of the African & African American Studies Program at Louisiana State University. He is co-editor of authored Esotericism in African American Religious Experience:… Sponsor: Center for the Study of World Religions. Contact: CSWR, 617.495.4476. Monday, November 2, 2020, 5:00 PM – 6:30 PM. Zoom (Registration required. See link in event description.).

Women Singing: The Regulation of Solo Female Vocals in Iran’s Hypermediated Public Sphere

Nahid Siamdoust (Yale University), Visiting Assistant Professor of Women’s Studies and Anthropology of Religion, will give the lecture, “Women Singing: The Regulation of Solo Female Vocals in Iran’s Hypermediated Public Sphere .” Zoom link forthcoming. Sponsor: Women's Studies in Religion Program at HDS. Contact: Tracy Wall. Thursday, November 12, 2020, 3:00 PM. Online.

Sisters of the Psychedelic Revolution: A Conversation with Leni Sinclair and Genie Parker

This event is free and open to the public, but registration is required.  Hippie culture left a lasting impression on the Mid-West of the United States. Historians tend to portray the Haight Ashbury of San Francisco and the East Village of Manhattan as America’s foremost psychedelic hotspots, but it was in the college town of Ann Arbor, Michigan, that the psychedelic revolution seems to have succeeded, at least partially. Leni Sinclair and Genie Parker were at the heart of Ann Arbor’s hippie scene. From their commune, Trans-Love Energy, they co-coordinated a robust alternative community, which included numerous underground newspapers, free health care clinics, free healthy food programs, a network of crashpads and communes, and weekly concerts in the park. Their motto was “S.T.P.” which stood for Serve The People. When the Black Panther Party called on the hippies to join them in an alliance, Sinclair and Parker co-founded the White Panther Party, which later broadened its coalition of allies and became the… Sponsor: Center for the Study of World Religions and Esalen. Contact: CSWR, 617.495.4476. Wednesday, November 18, 2020, 5:00 PM – 6:30 PM. Zoom (Registration required. See link in event description.). For more info visit harvard.zoom.us.