The Frick Collection

Official events calendar for The Frick Collection, New York. For more information, see www.frick.org.

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Continue the Conversation: Chardin, "Lady with a Bird-Organ"

Join fellow art enthusiasts online in a participatory conversation focused on a single masterpiece. Frick educators will lead these thoughtful and sustained dialogues in real time, using video conferencing. Because active participation is strongly encouraged, space is limited and sessions will not be recorded for future viewing. However, videos of other past programs are available on the Frick's YouTube channel. Instructions for video conferencing will be provided in an email to registered participants approximately 1-2 days in advance. An additional reminder email containing a link to a high-resolution image of the artwork will be sent a few hours before the program begins. Participants may also use a phone to listen-in while viewing an image of the artwork separately online. Participants admitted from the wait list may receive information closer to the program start time, depending on cancellations. Join Us: Free with online registration. Questions: education@frick.org. Audience: Adults. College & Graduate Students. Educators. High School Students. Middle School Students. Young Professionals. Wednesday, September 23, 2020, 5:00 PM – 6:00 PM. Video conferencing.

Cocktails with a Curator: Fragonard, 'The Progress of Love', Part One

Online Events This is an online event: Watch on YouTube Cocktails with a Curator | Fragonard, 'The Progress of Love' Part One Xavier F. Salomon, Deputy Director and Peter Jay Sharp Chief Curator About the YouTube Series: Cocktails with a Curator The Frick is concocting the perfect mix of cocktails and art. Every Friday at 5:00 p.m. join us for happy hour as a Frick curator (remotely) offers insights on a work of art with a complementary cocktail. Bring your own beverage to this virtual event. The Progress of Love Cocktail and Mocktail Recipe Audiences under 21 are encouraged to join with a non-alcoholic drink. Join Us: Watch on YouTube. Audience: Adults. Friday, September 25, 2020, 5:00 PM – 5:30 PM. Online event. Watch on YouTube. For more info visit www.frick.org.

Continue the Conversation: Chardin, "Lady with a Bird-Organ"

Join fellow art enthusiasts online in a participatory conversation focused on a single masterpiece. Frick educators will lead these thoughtful and sustained dialogues in real time, using video conferencing. Because active participation is strongly encouraged, space is limited and sessions will not be recorded for future viewing. However, videos of other past programs are available on the Frick's YouTube channel. Instructions for video conferencing will be provided in an email to registered participants approximately 1-2 days in advance. An additional reminder email containing a link to a high-resolution image of the artwork will be sent a few hours before the program begins. Participants may also use a phone to listen-in while viewing an image of the artwork separately online. Participants admitted from the wait list may receive information closer to the program start time, depending on cancellations. Join Us: Free with online registration. Questions: education@frick.org. Audience: Adults. College & Graduate Students. Educators. High School Students. Middle School Students. Young Professionals. Wednesday, September 30, 2020, 5:00 PM – 6:00 PM. Video conferencing.

Highlights of the Photoarchive 2: Restoration, Alteration, and Destruction

Library The Photoarchive, the Frick Art Reference Library's founding collection, comprises more than 1.2 million reproductions of works of art from the fourth century to the present day. This webinar will focus on Photoarchive images and documentation for works of art that have been restored, altered, or destroyed.     Paintings by Taddeo Gaddi, John Westbrooke Chandler, and John Singer Sargent will be presented as examples of the Photoarchive’s unique ability to document works of art over time.    This is one in a series of webinars about the Photoarchive. You can find the recording of previous webinars here. Please check our calendar regularly for additional events. Questions: photoarchive@frick.org. Join Us: Free, click ”Sign Up” to register. Library Series: Digital Art History. Audience: Adults. College & Graduate Students. Educators. High School Students. Young Professionals. Speaker: Members of the Frick Art Reference Library Photoarchive Department. Tuesday, October 6, 2020, 4:00 PM – 5:00 PM. Webinar information will be sent to attendees prior to the session. Eastern Daylight Time.

Collecting Impressions: Six Centuries of Print Connoisseurship Part I

Center for Collecting Antony Griffiths, Former Keeper, Department of Prints and Drawings, British Museum, presents the keynote in a series of four lectures on the history of collecting prints co-organized by the Center for the History of Collecting and The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Department of Drawings and Prints. The series is sponsored by the IFPDA foundation and takes place on four consecutive Wednesdays during Print Month: October 7th, 14th, 21st, and 28th at 12 pm. The Print Collector and the Printseller In recent years much has been written about print collectors but very little about printsellers. Yet the two depend on each other. No dealer can operate without customers, and no-one can collect without someone to buy from. This talk will explore the relationship of the two over the past five centuries, and trace the development of the print trade during this period. It concludes with some personal reminiscences about the changes seen over the past half-century. Image: Edgar Degas, The Collector of Prints, 1866. New… Join Us: Free, click ”Sign Up” to register. Questions: center@frick.org. Phone: 212 547 6894. Audience: Adults. College & Graduate Students. Educators. Young Professionals. Wednesday, October 7, 2020, 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM. Webinar information will be sent to attendees prior to the session. Eastern Daylight Time.

Continue the Conversation

Join fellow art enthusiasts online in a participatory conversation focused on a single masterpiece. Frick educators will lead these thoughtful and sustained dialogues in real time, using video conferencing. Because active participation is strongly encouraged, space is limited and sessions will not be recorded for future viewing. However, videos of other past programs are available on the Frick's YouTube channel. Instructions for video conferencing will be provided in an email to registered participants approximately 1-2 days in advance. An additional reminder email containing a link to a high-resolution image of the artwork will be sent a few hours before the program begins. Participants may also use a phone to listen-in while viewing an image of the artwork separately online. Participants admitted from the wait list may receive information closer to the program start time, depending on cancellations. Join Us: Free with online registration. Questions: education@frick.org. Audience: Adults. College & Graduate Students. Educators. High School Students. Middle School Students. Young Professionals. Wednesday, October 7, 2020, 5:00 PM – 6:00 PM. Video conferencing.

Collecting Impressions: Six Centuries of Print Connoisseurship Part II

Center for Collecting Karen Bowen, Independent Scholar, Antwerp Booksellers and the International Distribution of Prints from Antwerp in the Early Seventeenth Century While individual prints reveal much about what was produced and collected in the past, it is far more difficult to trace the means by which prints from diverse, distant places reached local printsellers and their clients in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. In particular, it is unknown how orders for prints were placed, in what quantities and via which routes images they were distributed, and the price paid for them. Using the remarkably extensive business accounts of the internationally successful Plantin-Moretus Press of Antwerp, Karen will reveal how the press helped local print publishers complete their independent transactions, not least by selling thousands of prints to their own international network of clients who also wished to profit from the immense demand for renowned prints from Antwerp. Co-organized by the Center for the History of Collecting… Join Us: Free, click ”Sign Up” to register. Questions: center@frick.org. Audience: Adults. College & Graduate Students. Young Professionals. Wednesday, October 14, 2020, 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM. Webinar information will be sent to attendees prior to the session. Eastern Daylight Time.

Continue the Conversation

Join fellow art enthusiasts online in a participatory conversation focused on a single masterpiece. Frick educators will lead these thoughtful and sustained dialogues in real time, using video conferencing. Because active participation is strongly encouraged, space is limited and sessions will not be recorded for future viewing. However, videos of other past programs are available on the Frick's YouTube channel. Instructions for video conferencing will be provided in an email to registered participants approximately 1-2 days in advance. An additional reminder email containing a link to a high-resolution image of the artwork will be sent a few hours before the program begins. Participants may also use a phone to listen-in while viewing an image of the artwork separately online. Participants admitted from the wait list may receive information closer to the program start time, depending on cancellations. Join Us: Free with online registration. Questions: education@frick.org. Audience: Adults. College & Graduate Students. Educators. High School Students. Middle School Students. Young Professionals. Wednesday, October 14, 2020, 5:00 PM – 6:00 PM. Video conferencing.

Technical Revolutions and Art History Part I

Online Events Historically, science and the humanities were not considered two separate disciplines: the separation of these two branches of knowledge developed only in the modern era. For art historians in the twenty-first century, this divide is only widening as some scholars embrace technological advances while others remain unconvinced that computational techniques and tools can bring meaningful changes to the field. Like the previous symposium “Searching Through Seeing: Optimizing Computer Vision Technology for the Arts” hosted by the Library in 2018, this four-part event seeks to encourage art historians to connect with the computer sciences by exploring the role that technology has played in the development of the field of art history and providing an opportunity for conversation and the exchange of ideas. The first session will be held on Thursday, October 15 from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. EDT. Professor Jessica Riskin of Stanford University will deliver a keynote lecture that will set the stage for a day of… Join Us: Free, click ”Sign Up” to register. Audience: Adults. College & Graduate Students. Educators. High School Students. Thursday, October 15, 2020, 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM. Webinar information will be sent to attendees prior to the session. Eastern Daylight Time.

Collecting Impressions: Six Centuries of Print Connoisseurship Part III

Center for Collecting Blair Asbury Brooks, Ph.D. candidate, The Graduate Center, CUNY Heinz Berggruen and the Postwar Print Market Co-organized by the Center for the History of Collecting and The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Department of Drawings and Prints, this series is made possible through the support of the IFPDA Foundation. Image: Heinz Berggruen in his apartment.  Date and photographer unknown. Join Us: Free, click ”Sign Up” to register. Audience: Adults. College & Graduate Students. Young Professionals. Educators. Wednesday, October 21, 2020, 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM. Webinar information will be sent to attendees prior to the session. Eastern Daylight Time.

Collecting Impressions: Six Centuries of Print Connoisseurship Part IV

Center for Collecting Jennifer Farrell, Associate Curator, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, concludes this four-part series on the history of collecting prints by interviewing collectors Leslie Garfield and Jordan Schnitzer. Co-organized by the Center for the History of Collecting and The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Department of Drawings and Prints, this series is made possible through the support of the IFPDA Foundation. Image: Edgar Degas, The Collector of Prints, 1866. New York, The Metropolitan Museum of Art. H. O. Havemeyer Collection, Bequest of Mrs. H. O. Havemeyer, 1929 (29.100.44). Join Us: Free, click ”Sign Up” to register. Questions: center@frick.org. Phone: 212 547 0715. Audience: Adults. College & Graduate Students. Young Professionals. Educators. Wednesday, October 28, 2020, 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM. Webinar information will be sent to attendees prior to the session. Eastern Daylight Time.

Technical Revolutions and Art History Part II

Online Events Historically, science and the humanities were not considered two separate disciplines: the separation of these two branches of knowledge developed only in the modern era. For art historians in the twenty-first century, this divide is only widening as some scholars embrace technological advances while others remain unconvinced that computational techniques and tools can bring meaningful changes to the field. Like the previous symposium “Searching Through Seeing: Optimizing Computer Vision Technology for the Arts” hosted by the Library in 2018, this four-part event seeks to encourage art historians to connect with the computer sciences by exploring the role that technology has played in the development of the field of art history and providing an opportunity for conversation and the exchange of ideas. The second session of this symposium will be held on Thursday, November 12 from 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. EST. Presentations will examine how the invention of photography impacted the study of art and how current… Join Us: Free, click ”Sign Up” to register. Audience: Adults. College & Graduate Students. Educators. High School Students. Thursday, November 12, 2020, 11:00 AM – 1:00 PM. Webinar information will be sent to attendees prior to the session. Eastern Daylight Time.

Illustrating Identity: Tracing Art with Genealogy and Genealogy with Art

Online Events Philip Sutton, The New York Public Library Irma and Paul Milstein Division of United States History, Local History, and Genealogy Looking for images of ancestors or historic figures? Trying to identify the locale in a painting? Follow New York Public Library's Philip Sutton as he employs genealogical resources and the Frick's renowned photoarchive to research the lives of artists, explore the locations and people depicted in paintings and search for images and information about historic persons. Join Us: Free, click ”Sign Up” to register. Audience: Adults. College & Graduate Students. Educators. High School Students. Young Professionals. Tuesday, November 17, 2020, 4:00 PM – 5:00 PM. Webinar information will be sent to attendees prior to the session. Eastern Daylight Time.